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April 26, 2019, 7 p.m. – 10 p.m.

“What’s in a body?” is the title of RANT's residency project at the Acts of Listening Lab.

From February 25 to March 1, while in residency at the Acts of Listening Lab, the ensemble members of RANT embarked on a deep-listening journey. They investigated their ability to listen, explored better listening practices and welcomed five participants to share personal stories about conflicts they've encountered. Mental health, political upheaval, peacekeeping in former Yugoslavia, and challenging complications in modern love were some of the themes brought to the residency over the week.

The ensemble saw their empathy challenged and developed a greater appreciation for deeper, holistic listening.

In this special open house performance, RANT will feature the invited participants, the stories they shared during the residency week and a live response to their stories by the ensemble members under the RANT format. This case is unique as the performers have had time since the residency week to study in detail video material and practice embodied expression connected to each of the participants.

Originally formulated by Concordia theatre and development alumnus Julian Duarte, BFA 18, the RANT performance event model is in continuing evolution. RANT is both a theatre company and a performance event that centres on the short playback form by the same name — rant —to reflect audience members' stories. Members of the public are invited to share stories imbued with bottled-up energy, intense emotions and thoughts, which are then reflected back to them by the ensemble.

When the event has had its fill of sharing, the combined compendium of all that has been offered is then repurposed into further aesthetic renditions of performance — an artistic transformation of the communal energy.

What you will witness is a work in progress and any thoughts or insights afterwards will be welcome.

The members of RANT are honoured to be artists in residence at the Acts of Listening Lab and appreciate the time and space given to them to deepen their work.

Click here for more information.

Friday, April 26, from 6 to 9pm

COHDS Film Festival highlights the link between oral history and creation. Our community of researchers, students, and artists use documentary film as a way to tell stories about the world that surrounds them, making oral history accessible to a wide audience. COHDS Film Festival features work by affiliates who use oral history and testimony in their creative practice. The festival will be an opportunity to watch films and open a dialogue between the affiliates and the community. 

Click here to register.

Thursday, April 18, from 10am to 12pm

With Zeina Allouche

The expected outcome of this workshop is to come out with an actual plan on an Oral History event to be led by COHDS affiliates. The workshop will guide the participants through conceptualization and planning of an event, to actual implementation and reporting back. This part is intended to map the tasks required, identify potential funding sources, brainstorm promotion channels, and point to Concordia University’s specific event planning policies, procedures, and tools.

Learning objectives:

At the end of this workshop, the participants will be able to:  

1. Conceptualize the goals and expected outcomes for an event

2. Map the tasks required to organize an event

3. Identify potential funding sources

4. Brainstorm methods of promotion to the campus community

Specifically to COHDS, the participants are expected to get out of this workshop with a specific oral history event plan and an implementation roadmap.

Thursday, April 18, from 12 to 2pm

With Sarah Lake and Vitalyi Bulychev

The workshop will be hosted by Sarah Lake, COHDS Digital Media and Projects Coordinator and Vitalyi Bulychev, COHDS Digital Media and Lab Technician.

This workshop will cover the basics of sound recording for interviews and oral history projects, including an overview of the audio equipment available to COHDS affiliates, a demonstration of different microphone setups, and general tips for recording high-quality sound. Sarah Lake and Vitalyi Bulychev both hold Film Production BFAs from Concordia’s Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema.

** Event will be given in the ALLab (LB 1042.02) **

Tuesday, April 16, from 5:30pm to 8:30pm

With Diane Roberts and Jessica Bleuer

Hosted by Mariana Marcassa and Susie Showers

Presented with support from Dr. Luis Sotelo Castro and the Acts of Listening Lab at Concordia University’s Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling (COHDS).

This event is the second in a series of three meetings where artists, scholars, students, and interdisciplinary professionals will share knowledge, techniques, and questions for performing traumatic narratives in theatre. Our aim is to gradually unfold a non-linear conversation through immersive workshops and dynamic discussions.

Discussion with Diane Roberts: Policing Safe(r) Space: Silencing the Critics in Performance (5:30pm)

Workshop with Jessica Bleuer: Preparing to​ Listen to​ Trauma: Supports and Limits (7:20pm)

Please note that the workshop Building a Project around Oral History has been rescheduled to Thursday, April 18, from 10am to 12pm, still at the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling. Our sincere apologies for any inconvenience.

 

[Le français suit]

A message from COHDS Lead Co-Director, Dr Cynthia Hammond:

Monday, April 15, from 3 to 5pm

With Sonia Dhaliwal

Since its inauguration, the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling has housed many interesting and important oral history archives. This short introduction to the principles and policies that govern the COHDS Archive will help users discover “hidden gems” and gain exposure to some basic tips for archiving oral history research.

Sonia Dhaliwal is the Archives Coordinator at COHDS. She has a masters degree in Information Studies from McGill and an undergraduate degree in History from the University of Waterloo. She is currently a masters student in History with research interests in children's identity formation, with a particular focus on the children of immigrant parents. In the future, she hopes to use her knowledge in history and archival skills to help document and preserve records of minorities in Canada in community archives.

Register here

29 mars de 18h à 20h - Lancement du nouveau site web de Page Rwanda et plateforme Archives vivantes

30 mars de 10h à 17h30 - Conférence: 25 ans après

31 mars de 13h à 16h - Journée jeunesse: Transmission de la mémoire

6 avril à 18h30 - Soirée film & témoignage

Thursday, March 28, from 5 to 7:30pm

With Christine Walley (MIT)

Exit Zero is a feature-length documentary film that tells a personal story of the lasting social and environmental impacts of “deindustrialization” and the key role it has played in expanding class inequalities in the United States.

Interweaving home movies, found footage, and a first person narrative, the film traces the stories of multiple generations of producer Christine Walley’s family in the once-thriving steel mill community of Southeast Chicago. From the turn-of-the-century experience of immigrants who worked in Chicago’s mammoth industries to the labor struggles of the 1930s to the seemingly unfathomable closure of the steel mills in the 1980s and 90s, these family stories convey a history that serves as a microcosm of the broader national experience of deindustrialization and its economic and environmental aftermath. The husband and wife filmmaking team (Chris Boebel, director/editor/co-writer and Christine Walley, producer/co-writer), use family stories to offer an unusually intimate look at the changing class landscape of the United States and the uncertain future faced by working people.

Register

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