Affilié chercheur

Ioana is Research Associate at DIALOG – Aboriginal peoples knowledge and research network (INRS) and part-time faculty member at the School of Community and Public Affairs, Concordia University. She is a self-identified settler scholar, an interdisciplinary, community-engaged researcher and educator who is focused on Indigenous wellbeing, knowledge mobilization, and oral history. Her doctoral work, for which she was awarded the Distinguished Doctoral Dissertation Prize in Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Concordia and Best Oral History Project (2016) from the Canadian Oral History Association, explored the connections between autonomy and wellbeing in Indigenous contexts through a case study in the Cree Nation of Chisasibi, Eeyou Istchee (also known as James Bay, northern Quebec). Ioana’s pedagogical approach favors experiential and interdisciplinary learning with a strong focus on critical thinking, knowledge mobilization, and research-creation. She is dedicated to closing the gap between academic research and the public, especially mobilizing knowledge for community capacity building. Ioana is an active member of COHDS having co-developed and delivered a bilingual intensive workshop with Aude Maltais-Landry on Decolonizing research: doing oral history in Indigenous contexts and more recently organized a series of lectures You are on Unceded Land to underline Indigenous presence in and around Montreal.

Creative outputs

2016 – Plan Nord and Indigenous peoples: Globalization and development in Northern Quebec (Overall coordination & deployment)

Students in Indigenous Peoples and Globalization (FPST 341) have collectively worked to create a comprehensive website outlining the Quebec economic and infrastructure agenda, Plan Nord. The articles explore aspects including but not limited to: land rights, economic benefits, ecological reports, sovereignty, education and housing ramifications, as well as the research of different impact assessments on the environment and local populations.

2015 – Companion website to PhD dissertation – www.chisasibi-healing.ca (Research, Design & Deployment)

This website is a companion to my PhD dissertation, in which I explore the connections between autonomy and wellbeing in Indigenous contexts through a case study in the Cree Nation of Chisasibi, Eeyou Istchee (James Bay, northern Quebec). The website includes five (5) Korsakow films (non-linear interactive film web platform) comprised of three (3) hours of footage or a total of 65 clips ranging from 2min to 7 min in length, edited from the eight (8) video interviews conducted during my PhD research.