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Public Talk with Laurajane Smith: Heritage and the Politics of Recognition

 

A public talk given by Professor Laurajane Smith, who will investigate the utility of theorizations in political philosophy around diversity and redistribution for understanding the political power and consequences of heritage.

This talk investigates the utility of theorizations in political philosophy around diversity and redistribution for understanding the political power and consequences of heritage. The politics of recognition is an attempt to both explain and address ways of influencing post-1960’s transformations in the political landscape, and in particular the politics of identity claims. Laurajane Smith argues that various ideas and expressions of heritage, whether that heritage be confederate statues, museum displays of national history, or local community cultural centres, may on the one hand be understood as implicated in the politics of recognition and on the other hand contribute to understanding the nuances of struggles for recognition and redistribution. She suggests that a consideration of the politics of recognition opens up new ways of evaluating and assessing the consequences and political impact of heritage that in turn requires a revaluation of the ethical and political responsibilities of heritage and museum professionals.

Date:  Wednesday April 18th, noon

Location:  Room LB 1014, 1400 De Maisonneuve W.

 

Laurajane Smith is professor and head of the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, and director of the Centre for Heritage and Museum Studies, at the Australian National University, Canberra. Originally from Australia, she worked for nine years at the University of York, England, where she directed the master’s degree in cultural heritage management. Her publications include Uses of Heritage (2006, Routledge), and the co-edited works Heritage, Labour and the Working Classes (2011) and Intangible Heritage (2009). She is currently working on a second edition of the latter, and co-editing the collection Emotion, Affective Practices, and the Past in the Present (2018). She is also writing a book for Routledge on her long-term research with visitors to museums and heritage sites. She is founder of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies, co-general editor of the Routledge series Key Issues in Cultural Heritage and editor of the International Journal of Heritage Studies.


 

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